The United States offers many job opportunities to people all over the world. Employment visas allow immigrants to work legally in this country, provided they fulfill all applicable criteria. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services explain the different type of work visas a person may apply for.

Temporary nonimmigrant vs. permanent immigrant workers

A temporary permit is issued to workers who are only in the U.S. for a limited period of time. A temporary visa is only good for the pre-specified period and the worker is not considered an immigrant to the country. As a result, the worker must leave when the work period ends or face legal consequences. Conversely, a permanent immigrant worker is permitted to remain in the country. He or she can also live in the U.S. permanently provided immigration information remains up-to-date.

Temporary business visits

If you only plan on visiting this country for a short period of time for the purpose to carry out business, a B-1 visa is applicable. You may also qualify for the Visa Waiver Program, which stipulates the citizens of certain countries are permitted to visit the U.S. for no longer than 90 days in order to pursue some business purpose. The waiver may be refused based on your country of origin, as well as your travel history. An immigration attorney can help you determine whether this or another employment option would be right for you.

Employer obligations

When offering a work visa, employers must perform due diligence. This involves verifying a worker’s status to ensure he or she is permitted to receive a work visa in this country. Some people are provided employment authorization based on their immigrant status. For instance, people granted asylum or refugees in this country are allowed to seek employment. Others will need to apply for employment authorization on their own, which is a separate process.