For immigrants who seek to work in the US, the first step that they need to take is to learn employment immigration law. The GBPI states that in Georgia immigrants own 31 percent of businesses; they comprise 23 percent of doctors and 10 percent of nurses. Immigration feeds the economy. If you are an immigrant seeking work, it’s crucial that you understand the basics of immigration law and particularly the difference between an immigrant status and nonimmigrant status.

Temporary, or nonimmigrant workers, are individuals who enter the US temporarily. These nonimmigrant workers remain for a period and have activity restrictions based on the reason they received a nonimmigrant visa. According to the Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division administers the Immigration and Nationality Act, which protects a variety of nonimmigrant workers.

Permanent workers have authorization to work and live on a permanent basis in the United States. In addition, students and exchange visitors may sometimes qualify for employment in the US. For students to work, they have to obtain permission first. The authorized official is the Designed School Official or DSO for students. The Responsible Officer, or RO, is for exchange visitors.

In addition, to applying for visas or establishing immigrant or nonimmigrant status, employers have to verify the person who they employ. Some people will need to apply individually for employment authorization. However, if you are a permanent resident, refugee, granted asylum or if you have a work-related non-immigrant classification, then you may already have employment authorization. Immigration status differs from person to person based on goals and immigration status.