Since the 2016 presidential election, non-U.S. citizens living in the United States have watched as many changes relating to immigration have been announced, implemented or attempted by the new administration. Many of these people have relatives who are U.S. citizens and they are also eagerly watching this evolving issue.

One topic garnering much attention is the program via which children brought into the country illegally by their parents may obtain status allowing them to live, work and study in the U.S. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, instituted in 2012, today remains in a state of limbo as the dispute between the current administration and the courts continues.

Supreme Court ruling in June 2020

After the President declared the desire to end the DACA program altogether, citing constitutional legality issues, the case made its way to the Supreme Court. In June of this year, the high court issued a ruling asserting that DACA remain in effect, confirming that the program was constitutional and legal.

Government response to court decision

As reported by CNN, at the end of July, the federal government issued a statement indicating it would not accept any new applications under the DACA program. In addition, the administration said that any renewals under DACA going forward would last for 12 months instead of the previous 24 months.

Just over one week after the first statement by the government, the sentiment was echoed in a statement by the Acting Homeland Security Secretary. Efforts to fully rescind the program have not yet resurfaced, but many remain concerned that the administration may attempt to do this once again despite the direction from the United States Supreme Court.