When you live in Georgia or another part of the United States but are not yet a citizen, you must work hard at staying on the right side of the law so not to jeopardize your ability to stay here. When you are not a U.S. citizen, any drug violation has the potential to trigger detention or deportation. If you have to leave the country, you may not be able to return.

According to the Drug Policy Alliance, hundreds of thousands of immigrants undergo deportation due to drug charges each year, even though many of them have no family or ties to their countries of origin.

Deportation statistics

Your chances of undergoing deportation following a drug charge are high as an immigrant. This holds true regardless of the type of drug crime authorities charge you with committing. Between 2012 and 2013, more than 13,000 immigrants underwent deportation just for being in possession of marijuana.

In total, more than 250,000 people have undergone deportation between 2007 and 2012. Drug-related deportations are also increasing across the nation, rising 43% within this same span.

Barriers faced by deportees

While you may struggle to find your footing in your country of origin after deportation due to language barriers, a lack of contacts and so on, you and your family may face other hurdles, too. Family members who remain in the United States may struggle to get by without your help. You may also find that you struggle to find or obtain quality health care in your new home, depending on the circumstances. Depending on where your home nation is, you may also face threats to your safety after undergoing deportation from the United States.