Why would a permanent U.S. resident face deportation?

Immigrants often believe that once they set foot in the country, their lives will change for the better. Though dreams are often realized here, there is still a host of reasons the government can deport green cardholders.

As a non-citizen resident of the United States, you may worry that one misstep could have you facing deportation.

What are the reasons for deportation?

There are various crimes that an immigrant can commit to incur potential deportation. These include being inadmissible at the time of entry to the country, smuggling someone else into the United States and committing marriage fraud. Marriage fraud entails remaining married for fewer than two years before obtaining a green card and terminating the union within the next two years. The immigrant must disprove accusations of a fraudulent marriage.

Additionally, a green cardholder could face deportation for committing crimes of moral turpitude within five years of admission to the country, certain felony convictions and certain drug crime convictions. Failing to properly register as a sex offender could also terminate a person’s right to remain in the United States. Abuse of drugs and the purchase of illegal firearms can also give the government grounds to deport someone.

What happens if the government seeks deportation?

In most instances, green cardholders are not deported immediately for committing one of the above offenses. Typically, they have the right to plea their case in immigration court.

The best bet for immigrants who hope to remain in the United States is to follow the rule of law in all instances.